End Secrecy!

With one shocking corporate tax scandal following after the other, it is time for the European Union to make multinational corporations publish basic information about where they make profits and what they are paying in taxes – so-called public country by country reporting. This would be a crucial step towards making sure corporations pay their fair share of tax, as it would allow parliamentarians, journalists, tax administrations, NGOs and citizens around the world to see the truth about multinationals’ economic activities.

However, the European Commission’s proposal is extremely weak. It would only oblige companies to publish country by country information from EU countries, and yet to be defined “uncooperative” countries. As long as some countries are not included in the reporting, companies will still be able to shift their profits around and avoid taxes. In addition, the proposal only covers companies with a turnover of more than €750 million, meaning 85-90% of the world’s multinational corporations would not be covered. When multinational corporations don’t pay their fair share of tax it hurts us all, through increasing inequality, painful austerity measures and loss of public services. According to conservative estimates, the EU is losing €50-70 billion each year due to corporate tax avoidance.

But the hardest impacts are felt in developing countries, who currently losing at least €100 billion every year due to tax avoidance by multinationals, yet who would be kept in the dark by this proposal.

Tweet or email the Members of the European Parliament today to make sure they make the proposal fit for purpose – see suggested tweets below!

Transparency would instead lead to a number of important benefits – including better conditions for small and medium enterprises, jobs, and much needed revenue to support public services and sustainable development. Here’s a list of 10 reasons why country by country reporting is a good idea . That’s why many have already expressed their strong support.

Making sure this proposal includes information from all countries where multinationals operate is key to ensuring ordinary citizens are not left footing the bill for a broken global tax system.

Now let’s make sure the European Parliament makes public country by country reporting work – tweet or email MEPs today!

Members of the European Parliament

LeadersJURI CommitteeECON CommitteeDEVE Committee

Leaders

Antonio Tajani

Antonio Tajani holds the powerful position of president of the European Parliament. His support would be an important step towards ensuring that the European Parliament ends up supporting public country by country reporting.

 

Manfred Weber

Manfred Weber holds an important position as leader of the European People's Party (Christian Democrats) group in the European Parliament. Support from him would help make sure that public country by country reporting becomes a reality. 

 

Guy Verhofstadt

As leader of the Alliance for Liberals and Democrats group, Guy Verhofstadt is in an influential position in the European Parliament. His support for the proposal would help ensure the Parliament ends up supporting it.

 

Philippe Lamberts

Philippe Lamberts, as co-chair of the Group of the Greens/European Free Alliance and a member of the economic and monetary affairs committee of the European Parliament, can play a key role in winning the European Parliament’s support for public country by country reporting

 

Ska Keller

As co-chair of the Group of the Greens/European Free Alliance, Ska Keller holds an influential position in the European Parliament. Her support can be an important step towards public country by country reporting.

 

Gabriele Zimmer

Gabriele Zimmer holds an important position in the European Parliament as leader of the Confederal Group of the European United Left - Nordic Green Left. Her support would mean public country by country reporting takes an important step toward becoming a reality.

 

Gianni Pittella

As the leader of the Group of the Progressive Alliance of Socialists and Democrats, Gianni Pittella holds a powerful position in the European Parliament. His support would be an important step towards reaching agreement on public country by country reporting.

 

JURI Committee

Evelyn Regner

Evelyn Regner is the rapporteur for the proposal on public country by country reporting in the European Parliament’s legal affairs committee, and is therefore one of the two most central players in the process. Her support is vital to ensuring an ambitious outcome. 

    

Rosa Estaras Ferragut

Rosa Estaras Ferragut is a shadow rapporteur in the legal affairs committee in the European Parliament on country by country reporting. Her support can help making sure that public country by country reporting becomes a reality. 

    

Sajjad Karim

Sajjad Karam is a shadow rapporteur in the legal affairs committee in the European Parliament. Support from him would help make sure that public country by country reporting becomes a reality. 

    

Jean-Marie Cavada

Jean-Marie Cavada is a shadow rapporteur in the legal affairs committee and as such can play an important role in making sure the European Parliament supports public country by country reporting. 

 

    

Jiri Mastalka

Jiri Mistalka is a shadow rapprteur in the legal affairs committee in the European Parliament and will play an important role in making sure that the European Parliament supports public country by country reporting. 

    

Laura Ferrara

Laura Ferrara is a shadow rapporteur in the legal affairs committee of the European Parliament, one of the two key decision making committees, and as such has a vital role to play in the process of making public country by country reporting a reality.

    

Pascal Durand

As a shadow rapporteur in the European Parliament’s legal affairs committee, Pascal Durand has an important role to play in getting the European Parliament to support public country by country reporting and thereby make it harder for multinational corporations to dodge taxes.

 

    

Pavel Svoboda

Pavel Svoboda holds the powerful position as chair of the legal affairs committee, which is one of the two committees responsible for ensuring that the European Parliament ends up supporting public country by country reporting. By supporting this proposal, Svoboda can make an important step towards ensuring that multinational corporations pay their fair share of taxes.  

    

Axel Voss

Axel Voss is a member of the legal affairs committee. His support can help making sure that public country by country reporting becomes a reality.

    

Mady Delvaux

Mady Delvaux is a member in the legal affairs committee in the European Parliament and as such can play an important role in making sure the parliament adopts robust legislation on public country by country reporting.

    

Tadeusz Zwiefka

Tadeusz Zwiefka is a member of the legal affairs committee. By supporting public country by country reporting Zwiefka can help ensure real progress towards putting an end to tax avoidance by multinational corporations.   

    

Therese Comodini Cachia

Therese Comodini Cachia is a member of the legal affairs committee in the European Parliament. By supporting public country by country reporting she can take an important step towards ensuring that multinational corporations pay their fair share of taxes.

    

António Marinho e Pinto

António Marinho e Pinto is a member of the legal affairs committee. Support from him would help to make sure that public country by country reporting becomes a reality. 

    

ECON Committee

Hugues Bayet

Hugues Bayet is the rapporteur for the proposal on public country by country reporting in the European Parliament’s economic and monetary affairs committee. As one of the most central players in the process, he has a vital role to play in ensuring the parliament supports this legislation.

 

Dariusz Rosati

Dariusz Rosati is a shadow rapporteur in the European Parliament’s economic and monetary affairs committee, one of the two key decision making committees. His support for public country by country reporting will help ensure that an ambitious proposal is adopted.

 

Pirkko Ruohonen-Lerner

As a shadow rapprteur in the economic and monetary affairs committee, Pirkko Ruohonen-Lerner has an important role to play in ensuring the European Parliament ends up supporting strong public country by country reporting.

 

Enrique Calvet Chambon

Enrique Calvet Chambon is a shadow rapporteur in the economic and monetary affairs committee of the European Parliament. His support would be an important step towards an ambitious proposal on public country by country reporting.

 

Ernest Urtasun

Ernest Urtasun is a shadow rapporteur in the economic and monetary affairs committee, one of the two lead committees responsible for amending the legislation on public country by country reporting. His support would be an important step towards an ambitious proposal on public country by country reporting.

 

Miguel Viegas

Miguel Viegas is a shadow rapporteur in the economic and monetary affairs committee for the proposal on public country by country reporting. As a coordinator for this committee, Viegas will play a central role in ensuring that the European Parliament ends up supporting public country by country reporting.

 

Roberto Gualtieri

Roberto Gualtieri is the chair of the economic and monetary affairs committee, which is one of the key committees in the European Parliament responsible for examining the public country by country reporting legislation. His support would be an important step towards an ambitious proposal on public country by country reporting.

 

Pervenche Beres

Pervenche Beres is one of the key members of the economic and monetary affairs committee. Beres’s support can help make sure that public country by country reporting becomes a reality.

 

Burkhard Balz

As a member of the economic and monetary affairs committee, Burkhard Balz can make an important step towards ensuring that multinational corporations pay their fair share of taxes by supporting public country by country reporting.

 

Werner Langen

Werner Langen is the chair of the committee of inquiry into money laundering, tax avoidance and tax evasion that was established following the Panama Papers leaks. By supporting public country by country reporting, Langen can help ensure that multinationals pay their profits where they have their real business activities.

 

Sylvie Goulard

Sylvie Goulard is a member of the economic and monetary affairs committee and as such has an important role to play in ensuring the European Parliament ends up supporting strong public country by country reporting. 

 

Cora van Nieuwenhuizen

Cora van Nieuwenhuizen is a member of the economic and monetary affairs committee. Support from her would help make sure that public country by country reporting becomes a reality. 

 

 

Brian Hayes

Brian Hayes is a member of the economic and monetary affairs committee. His support would be an important step towards ensuring that the European Parliament ends up supporting public country by country reporting. 

 

Petr Ježek

As a member of the economic and monetary affairs committee, Petr Ježek can make an important step towards ensuring that multinational corporations pay their fair share of taxes by supporting public country by country reporting. 

 

Michael Theurer

Michael Theurer is a member of the economic and monetary affairs committee. His support would be an important step towards an ambitious proposal on public country by country reporting. 

 

DEVE Committee

Elly Schlein

Elly Schlein leads the development committee’s work on public country by country reporting, which will provide guiding input to the two lead committees. Public country by country reporting is a vital tool for developing countries to fight tax avoidance and mobilise domestic resources to fund their economic development.

    

Linda McAvan

Linda McAvan holds the powerful position of chair of the development committee. Her support would be an important step towards ensuring that the European Parliament ends up supporting public country by country reporting.

    

Resources

Why public country by country reporting?

Many have already expressed strong support for public CBCR:

10 reasons why CBCR is a good idea

Since 2015, big banks in Europe have been obliged to report their profits and taxes on a country-by-country basis. See what they think:

 

The High-level panel on illicit financial flows from Africa, chaired by former President of South Africa Thabo Mbeki, highlighted that: 

We were encouraged by the emergence of discussions on country-by-country reporting of employees, profits, sales and taxes as a means of ensuring transparency in cross-border transactions. Country-by-country reporting, publically available, will help to show where substantial activity is taking place and the relative profits generated and taxes paid.

 

Taxes are collected nationally, which means country-by-country information is essential to know whether corporations are paying a fair amount to each country” – European Federation of Public Service Unions.

 

After assessing what public country by country reporting would mean for banks, the European Commission itself concluded that: “It is the assessment of the Commission, notably based on the results of the study and the views expressed by the stakeholders, that, at this stage, the public country-by-country reporting of information under Article 89 of Directive 2013/36/EU is not expected to have significant negative economic impact, in particular on competitiveness, investment, credit availability or the stability of the financial system. On the contrary, it seems that there could be some limited positive impact.” 

 

States should make country-by-country reports available to the public within 30 days of filing.”

Declaration of the Independent Commission for the Reform of International Corporate taxation.

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